What's in Your Disaster-Preparedness Bag?

12:20 PM

The sky outside hid behind a white veil that concealed everything.

That was yesterday.

Today, the metro is surrounded by growling nimbus-es waiting for their cue to unleash their load.

I have been mulling over this post for more than a month, never convinced that it is good enough.
This time, I will heed Seth Godin's advice and just fucking ship.

Yes, by this time, we are all aware that the rainy season is upon us. One of the things I was taught to do during this season, was to replenish our disaster bag or as my dad fondly called it; D-Bag  (Now you know where I get my irreverence).

We were supposed to have two, one for home and one that we carry everywhere.

The biggest challenge for me was the dent it put in my grocery budget--the perils of living alone. This is why it's best to start small and build it with every passing salary.

I'm sharing this in the hopes that it could help you the same way it came handy for us.

Home

Clean Drinking Water

Small separate bottles are ideal for mobility and prevention of contamination. I started with 500 and 350ml bottles. While big containers allow you to stock more drinking water for the fam, these are mobile-friendly.


Non-Perishable Food
Canned goods

While I can never be as good as that dude in Resident Evil (dammit, I hate that movie adaptation) who had an uncanny ability to tell what's inside your unlabeled can of goodies, it is wise to stack up on cans that do not require can openers. Unless you can open it with your teeth, then by all means, go ahead, and make sure to join my party when the Z-invasion happens.


Crackers

These babies do not need to be cooked and will provide the salt your body needs to prevent cramping. It is not healthy to consume these regularly, but on rainy days Ready-to-Eat is your best bet.


Instant Noodles


Nothing helps beat the cold better than a hot steaming soup. And since one is expected to have limited resources at this point, instant is ideal.


Portable Cooking Device

How else are you going to cook a pack of hot noodles without electricity? The idea is to stay warm, just in case you weren't too sure.




Plastic bags/ziplock bags


The problem with placing things in an elevated surface is that you have to keep putting them in a higher place as the flood gets higher. I learned that the hard way during Ondoy, after all my clothes have been dyed a muddy chocolate brown.
Just put them in a plastic bag, seal, and keep away from any sharp objects.

The same goes for your devices. Zip, secure in your pocket, and fearlessly face the rain.
No? Sorry. Bad humor.

Tool Kit/ Swiss Knife

Can opener-busted door opener-loom band cutter. A Swiss Knife is portable and will help you in many sticky situations.

Mobile

The D-bag I usually bring with me consist of folded ziplock or plastic bags, a Swiss Knife, some crackers, and coffee. Because coffee is of paramount importance. 
If you've ever been stranded, you'll be thankful you had these on hand. 

There is a fine line between being disaster ready and hoarding. If it's just the essentials, you're still good.

I didn't add umbrellas because I have a history of accidentally hitting random strangers with my umbrella






The red cross suggests this survival kit.for home use.

Stay dry everyone!
Now for that soup :3

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